Course1

Closely Held Stock Options, Restricted Stock, Etc.

$79.00

Equity-based compensation is often essential to recruiting and retaining key employees in closely held companies.  Whether through the use of stock options, restricted stock, appreciation rights or other instruments and techniques, incentive compensation aligns the financial interests of key employees with the entity. Incentive compensation also often has the benefit of not requiring the immediately outlay of cash. Depending on the instruments used, equity-based compensation may also help defer tax recognition.  Compensation in LLCs takes on different forms but functions similarly. This program will provide you with a practical guide to equity-based incentive compensation in closely held companies. C and S Corp incentive compensation v. pass-through entity incentive compensation Eligibility for tax-favored Incentive Stock Options v. non-qualified stock options Use of restricted stock – valuation, vesting, and treatment Appreciation rights in corporate and pass-through entities Common structuring and drafting traps Tax treatment, advantages and disadvantages of incentive compensation   Speaker:

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/16/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Exit Rights in Business Agreements

$79.00

A client investment in an operating business, particularly a minority stake, is only as good as its liquidity rights. If a client cannot readily sell his or her ownership stake at fair market value, it has little real value. The key to ensuring liquidity is contractually creating a private market for the ownership stake. This market can come in the form of requiring other stakeholders, including the majority owner, to buy the minority stake at a mutually agreeable price, or creating other mechanisms for selling the stake to third parties. Without these contract rights, a stakeholder has no liquidity and is stuck. This program will provide you with a practical to planning and drafting contractual liquidity rights in closely held companies.   Planning and drafting liquidity rights in closely held companies Counseling clients about the limitations and risks of liquidity in closely held companies Framework of alternatives for determining most appropriate liquidity rights “Texas standoff” or “Russian roulette” – opportunities, risks and tradeoffs Drafting “tag-along” and “drag-along” rights – practical uses and drawbacksHow to think about valuing closely held ownership stakes   Speaker: Michael Weiner is a partner in the Denver office of Dorsey & Whitney, where he is head of the firm’s corporate department.  His practice focuses on the representation of emerging growth companies in the areas of corporate formation, mergers and acquisitions, venture capital and angel finance, public offerings, and securities regulation. He counsels boards of directors and management teams in the areas of equity compensation, corporate governance, Sarbanes-Oxley and other regulatory and disclosure matters. He also advises clients on intellectual property licensing and commercial contract matters.  Mr. Weiner earned his B.S. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business, his B.A. in American history from the University of Pennsylvania College of Arts & Sciences, and J.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/16/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Exit Rights in Business Agreements

$79.00

A client investment in an operating business, particularly a minority stake, is only as good as its liquidity rights. If a client cannot readily sell his or her ownership stake at fair market value, it has little real value. The key to ensuring liquidity is contractually creating a private market for the ownership stake. This market can come in the form of requiring other stakeholders, including the majority owner, to buy the minority stake at a mutually agreeable price, or creating other mechanisms for selling the stake to third parties. Without these contract rights, a stakeholder has no liquidity and is stuck. This program will provide you with a practical to planning and drafting contractual liquidity rights in closely held companies.   Planning and drafting liquidity rights in closely held companies Counseling clients about the limitations and risks of liquidity in closely held companies Framework of alternatives for determining most appropriate liquidity rights “Texas standoff” or “Russian roulette” – opportunities, risks and tradeoffs Drafting “tag-along” and “drag-along” rights – practical uses and drawbacksHow to think about valuing closely held ownership stakes   Speaker: Michael Weiner is a partner in the Denver office of Dorsey & Whitney, where he is head of the firm’s corporate department.  His practice focuses on the representation of emerging growth companies in the areas of corporate formation, mergers and acquisitions, venture capital and angel finance, public offerings, and securities regulation. He counsels boards of directors and management teams in the areas of equity compensation, corporate governance, Sarbanes-Oxley and other regulatory and disclosure matters. He also advises clients on intellectual property licensing and commercial contract matters.  Mr. Weiner earned his B.S. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business, his B.A. in American history from the University of Pennsylvania College of Arts & Sciences, and J.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/16/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Holding Business Interests in Trusts

$79.00

There are tax and other benefits to holding a closely-held company or other business interests in a trust.  But there are also substantial risks.  Trusts are typically required to diversify their holdings. But when a company is held in a trust there is almost a highly concentrated, and thus risky, position. Similarly, holding real estate or nontraditional assets also involves issues of liquidity and proper fiduciary and income tax administration. This program will provide you with a real world guide placing business interests in a trust. Dilemmas of operating companies in trusts – concentrated assets, speed, decision-making Concentrated assets and the fiduciary duty to diversify Counseling clients about the right trust for different asset classes Preserving S Corp status or other tax benefits in trust Business succession planning for family businesses Managing minority stakes in operating companies or assets Financial and tax administration traps Speakers: Michael Sneeringer a partner in the Naples, Florida office of Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP, where his practice focuses on trust and estate planning, probate administration, asset protection planning, and tax law. He has served as vice chair of the asset protection planning committee of the ABA’s Real Property, Trust and Estate Section and is an official reporter of the Heckerling Institute.  Mr. Sneeringer received his B.A. from Washington & Jefferson College, his J.D., cum laude, St. Thomas University School of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami School of Law. Missia H. Vaselaney is a partner in the Cleveland office of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister, LLP, where her practice focuses on estate planning for individuals and businesses.  She also represents clients before federal and state taxing authorities.  Ms. Vaselaney is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and has been a member of the Steering Committee for AICPA’s National Advanced Estate Planning Conference since 2001.  Ms. Vaselaney received her B.A. from the University of Dayton and her J.D. from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/18/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Holding Business Interests in Trusts

$79.00

There are tax and other benefits to holding a closely-held company or other business interests in a trust.  But there are also substantial risks.  Trusts are typically required to diversify their holdings. But when a company is held in a trust there is almost a highly concentrated, and thus risky, position. Similarly, holding real estate or nontraditional assets also involves issues of liquidity and proper fiduciary and income tax administration. This program will provide you with a real world guide placing business interests in a trust. Dilemmas of operating companies in trusts – concentrated assets, speed, decision-making Concentrated assets and the fiduciary duty to diversify Counseling clients about the right trust for different asset classes Preserving S Corp status or other tax benefits in trust Business succession planning for family businesses Managing minority stakes in operating companies or assets Financial and tax administration traps Speakers: Michael Sneeringer a partner in the Naples, Florida office of Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP, where his practice focuses on trust and estate planning, probate administration, asset protection planning, and tax law. He has served as vice chair of the asset protection planning committee of the ABA’s Real Property, Trust and Estate Section and is an official reporter of the Heckerling Institute.  Mr. Sneeringer received his B.A. from Washington & Jefferson College, his J.D., cum laude, St. Thomas University School of Law, and his LL.M. from the University of Miami School of Law. Missia H. Vaselaney is a partner in the Cleveland office of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister, LLP, where her practice focuses on estate planning for individuals and businesses.  She also represents clients before federal and state taxing authorities.  Ms. Vaselaney is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and has been a member of the Steering Committee for AICPA’s National Advanced Estate Planning Conference since 2001.  Ms. Vaselaney received her B.A. from the University of Dayton and her J.D. from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/18/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Unwinding a Commercial Real Estate Transaction Gone Bad, Part 1

$79.00

  When a real estate project goes bad for whatever reason – sales are slow or at prices below projections, leasing is slow, or there are extensive cost-overruns or regulatory delays – developers, investors, lenders, and others are left scrambling to restructure the project and salvage any value or at least limit losses.This often involves restructuring or possibly refinancing a loan.  It may also involve additional equity.  Another option is selling the project, if possible.  These processes can be complicated by the nature of the investors and lenders involved.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to restructuring troubled real estate projects.    Day 1: Practical strategies for unwinding real estate deals outside of bankruptcy or litigation Negotiating, structuring and drafting the restructuring of failed real estate projects Underlying economics and tradeoffs of real estate restructuring Types of sellers and their impact on restructuring – individual owner, institutional, joint venture, private equity Complications and limitations involving syndicated loans, CMBS loans, and REMICs Navigating seller issues – personal guaranties, ongoing management fees, upside participation, reputation   Day 2: Restructuring alternatives, including straight purchases, “Loan to Own,” rescue capital/preferred stock/securities Drafting forbearance and loan modification agreements Receivership of distressed properties and planning to emerge from receivership “Loan to own” strategies and limitations Tax issues, including cancellation of indebtedness and restructuring recourse indebtedness Potential loss of valuable tax attributes and tax planning opportunities   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  He speaks extensively on real estate topics nationally.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/19/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Unwinding a Commercial Real Estate Transaction Gone Bad, Part 1

$79.00

  When a real estate project goes bad for whatever reason – sales are slow or at prices below projections, leasing is slow, or there are extensive cost-overruns or regulatory delays – developers, investors, lenders, and others are left scrambling to restructure the project and salvage any value or at least limit losses.This often involves restructuring or possibly refinancing a loan.  It may also involve additional equity.  Another option is selling the project, if possible.  These processes can be complicated by the nature of the investors and lenders involved.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to restructuring troubled real estate projects.    Day 1: Practical strategies for unwinding real estate deals outside of bankruptcy or litigation Negotiating, structuring and drafting the restructuring of failed real estate projects Underlying economics and tradeoffs of real estate restructuring Types of sellers and their impact on restructuring – individual owner, institutional, joint venture, private equity Complications and limitations involving syndicated loans, CMBS loans, and REMICs Navigating seller issues – personal guaranties, ongoing management fees, upside participation, reputation   Day 2: Restructuring alternatives, including straight purchases, “Loan to Own,” rescue capital/preferred stock/securities Drafting forbearance and loan modification agreements Receivership of distressed properties and planning to emerge from receivership “Loan to own” strategies and limitations Tax issues, including cancellation of indebtedness and restructuring recourse indebtedness Potential loss of valuable tax attributes and tax planning opportunities   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  He speaks extensively on real estate topics nationally.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/19/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Unwinding a Commercial Real Estate Transaction Gone Bad, Part 2

$79.00

When a real estate project goes bad for whatever reason – sales are slow or at prices below projections, leasing is slow, or there are extensive cost-overruns or regulatory delays – developers, investors, lenders, and others are left scrambling to restructure the project and salvage any value or at least limit losses.This often involves restructuring or possibly refinancing a loan.  It may also involve additional equity.  Another option is selling the project, if possible.  These processes can be complicated by the nature of the investors and lenders involved.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to restructuring troubled real estate projects.    Day 1: Practical strategies for unwinding real estate deals outside of bankruptcy or litigation Negotiating, structuring and drafting the restructuring of failed real estate projects Underlying economics and tradeoffs of real estate restructuring Types of sellers and their impact on restructuring – individual owner, institutional, joint venture, private equity Complications and limitations involving syndicated loans, CMBS loans, and REMICs Navigating seller issues – personal guaranties, ongoing management fees, upside participation, reputation   Day 2: Restructuring alternatives, including straight purchases, “Loan to Own,” rescue capital/preferred stock/securities Drafting forbearance and loan modification agreements Receivership of distressed properties and planning to emerge from receivership “Loan to own” strategies and limitations Tax issues, including cancellation of indebtedness and restructuring recourse indebtedness Potential loss of valuable tax attributes and tax planning opportunities   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  He speaks extensively on real estate topics nationally.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/20/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Unwinding a Commercial Real Estate Transaction Gone Bad, Part 2

$79.00

When a real estate project goes bad for whatever reason – sales are slow or at prices below projections, leasing is slow, or there are extensive cost-overruns or regulatory delays – developers, investors, lenders, and others are left scrambling to restructure the project and salvage any value or at least limit losses.This often involves restructuring or possibly refinancing a loan.  It may also involve additional equity.  Another option is selling the project, if possible.  These processes can be complicated by the nature of the investors and lenders involved.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to restructuring troubled real estate projects.    Day 1: Practical strategies for unwinding real estate deals outside of bankruptcy or litigation Negotiating, structuring and drafting the restructuring of failed real estate projects Underlying economics and tradeoffs of real estate restructuring Types of sellers and their impact on restructuring – individual owner, institutional, joint venture, private equity Complications and limitations involving syndicated loans, CMBS loans, and REMICs Navigating seller issues – personal guaranties, ongoing management fees, upside participation, reputation   Day 2: Restructuring alternatives, including straight purchases, “Loan to Own,” rescue capital/preferred stock/securities Drafting forbearance and loan modification agreements Receivership of distressed properties and planning to emerge from receivership “Loan to own” strategies and limitations Tax issues, including cancellation of indebtedness and restructuring recourse indebtedness Potential loss of valuable tax attributes and tax planning opportunities   Speaker: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  He speaks extensively on real estate topics nationally.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/20/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

2020 Trust Litigation Update

$79.00

Baby Boomers are retiring with more wealth – and more complicated family situations – than earlier generations.This wealth and demographic complexity are generating more ever more trust litigation. This litigation includes the extent to which trust interests are reachable in divorce proceedings; fiduciary investment decisions, the handling of concentrated positions in closely held companies, and arguably tortious interference with trust interests. These and many other significant developments trends will be discussed. This program will provide you with a practical guide to significant developments in trust and estate litigation. Tortious interference with inheritance interests Handling concentrated positions in closely held companies Disputes involving operation of family businesses in trusts Trust interests in divorce Counseling clients when fiduciary litigation involves family animosity Modifying trust interests through litigation   Speakers:

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/21/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

Drafting Waivers of Conflicts of Interest

$79.00

A bedrock principle of lawyer ethics is that lawyers owe their clients loyalty, free of conflicts of interest, unless those conflicts are waived by a client in writing. Clients are entitled to zealous representation without the lawyer being conflicted by other representations. When a conflict arises, the lawyer is required to decline the representation, unless the conflict is explicitly waived by the client.  But waivers are not always easily accomplished.  They must be carefully drafted, particularly when it purports to be of an anticipated conflict, not an existing conflict. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the rules governing conflict waivers, types of waivers, and drafting tips.  Key provisions of waivers and ensuring there is “informed” consent Advance waivers – drafting waivers for anticipated conflicts Types of advance waivers – stating subject area, adverse parties, neither or both Sources of rules and practical guidance on drafting waivers Common mistakes made in drafting waivers Consequences of ineffective waivers   Speaker: William Freivogel Mr. Freivogel is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is a member of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers Manual on Professional Conduct and recent past Chair of the ABA Business Law Section Committee on Professional Responsibility.  He maintains the Web site, Freivogel on Conflicts, at www.freivogelonconflicts.com

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/22/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Trust and Estate Planning for Retirement Plans – IRAs, 401(k)s, and More

$79.00

  The single biggest asset most clients have is their retirement account – IRAs, 401(k)s, other defined benefit plans, and annuities. These retirement plans are often tax-favored but in exchange for that status come with a variety of restrictions. Each is also governed not only by the underlying terms of its sponsors and providers but by an array of complex tax regulations.  Understanding how these complex financial products are treated not only for tax purposes but, often more importantly, for purposes of transfer at death is the central focus of trust and estate plans for most clients.  This program will provide you with a guide to tax treatment and transfer rules of client retirement assets.    Allocation of estate and gift taxes QTIPing IRAs and trusts as IRA beneficiaries Trust distributions as income v. principal Understanding traps of beneficiary designations Creditor claims against retirement assets How annuity distributions are treated for income tax purposes – ordinary income, capital gain, return of investment   Speakers: Daniel L. Daniels is a partner in the Greenwich, Connecticut office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where his practice focuses on representing business owners, corporate executives and other wealthy individuals and their families.  A Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America,” and has been named by “Worth” magazine as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in the United States representing affluent individuals. Mr. Daniels is co-author of a monthly column in “Trusts and Estates” magazine.  Mr. Daniels received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and received his J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/23/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Trust and Estate Planning for Retirement Plans – IRAs, 401(k)s, and More

$79.00

  The single biggest asset most clients have is their retirement account – IRAs, 401(k)s, other defined benefit plans, and annuities. These retirement plans are often tax-favored but in exchange for that status come with a variety of restrictions. Each is also governed not only by the underlying terms of its sponsors and providers but by an array of complex tax regulations.  Understanding how these complex financial products are treated not only for tax purposes but, often more importantly, for purposes of transfer at death is the central focus of trust and estate plans for most clients.  This program will provide you with a guide to tax treatment and transfer rules of client retirement assets.    Allocation of estate and gift taxes QTIPing IRAs and trusts as IRA beneficiaries Trust distributions as income v. principal Understanding traps of beneficiary designations Creditor claims against retirement assets How annuity distributions are treated for income tax purposes – ordinary income, capital gain, return of investment   Speakers: Daniel L. Daniels is a partner in the Greenwich, Connecticut office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where his practice focuses on representing business owners, corporate executives and other wealthy individuals and their families.  A Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America,” and has been named by “Worth” magazine as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in the United States representing affluent individuals. Mr. Daniels is co-author of a monthly column in “Trusts and Estates” magazine.  Mr. Daniels received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and received his J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School.    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/23/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Drafting Small Commecial Real Estate Leases

$79.00

In small space leases, tenants are much more sensitive to the cost or reviewing and negotiating lengthy leases.  Also, use restrictions in lengthier leases can unduly restrict a tenant’s ability to use the space to operate their business.  Landlord rights and remedies in “short “form” leases tend to leave tenants with little flexibility and few remedies for landlord breaches.  At the same time, landlords fear the instability and costs associated with small tenants. This program will provide you a real-world guide to reviewing a small commercial lease, including economics, use restrictions, subleasing, and remedies. Red flags in “short form” leases for small tenants Ensuring “use” restrictions allow tenant to operate its business Common area maintenance, taxes, insurance, fees and penalties Scope of landlord services to tenant – and landlord remedies Exit issues – “go dark” provisions, subletting, tail liability Speaker: David C. Camp is a partner in the Denver office of Senn Visciano Canges, PC, where he represents clients in all aspects of real estate transactions.  He has extensive experience in leasing, development, construction, financing and ownership issues.  He also has substantial experience in commercial finance matters, most frequently corporate and real estate financing, including mezzanine loans, construction loans, and traditional loan matters.  Mr. Camp received his B.A. cum laude from Middlebury College and his J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/24/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Drafting Small Commecial Real Estate Leases

$79.00

In small space leases, tenants are much more sensitive to the cost or reviewing and negotiating lengthy leases.  Also, use restrictions in lengthier leases can unduly restrict a tenant’s ability to use the space to operate their business.  Landlord rights and remedies in “short “form” leases tend to leave tenants with little flexibility and few remedies for landlord breaches.  At the same time, landlords fear the instability and costs associated with small tenants. This program will provide you a real-world guide to reviewing a small commercial lease, including economics, use restrictions, subleasing, and remedies. Red flags in “short form” leases for small tenants Ensuring “use” restrictions allow tenant to operate its business Common area maintenance, taxes, insurance, fees and penalties Scope of landlord services to tenant – and landlord remedies Exit issues – “go dark” provisions, subletting, tail liability Speaker: David C. Camp is a partner in the Denver office of Senn Visciano Canges, PC, where he represents clients in all aspects of real estate transactions.  He has extensive experience in leasing, development, construction, financing and ownership issues.  He also has substantial experience in commercial finance matters, most frequently corporate and real estate financing, including mezzanine loans, construction loans, and traditional loan matters.  Mr. Camp received his B.A. cum laude from Middlebury College and his J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/24/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Lawyer Ethics and Email

$79.00

  Email has become essential to law practice.  Communications with clients and colleagues is practically impossible – and absolutely inefficient – without email.  But the ubiquity of email may obscure many important ethical issues that arise when it is used in law practice, including issues related to confidentiality, metadata, and the attorney-client privilege. These and other substantial ethical questions will be discussed in this practical guide to the ethical issues when lawyers use email in their practices. Beginning an attorney relationship via email – intentionally and inadvertently Security and confidentiality when email is exchanged in the Cloud Inadvertently sent email and metadata embedded in email Discarding/deleting email and working with outside vendors Ex parte communications with represented adversaries Attorney-client privilege issues Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750-page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/25/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Lawyer Ethics and Email

$79.00

  Email has become essential to law practice.  Communications with clients and colleagues is practically impossible – and absolutely inefficient – without email.  But the ubiquity of email may obscure many important ethical issues that arise when it is used in law practice, including issues related to confidentiality, metadata, and the attorney-client privilege. These and other substantial ethical questions will be discussed in this practical guide to the ethical issues when lawyers use email in their practices. Beginning an attorney relationship via email – intentionally and inadvertently Security and confidentiality when email is exchanged in the Cloud Inadvertently sent email and metadata embedded in email Discarding/deleting email and working with outside vendors Ex parte communications with represented adversaries Attorney-client privilege issues Speaker: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750-page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/25/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Drafting Business Service Agreements

$79.00

  Companies are increasingly focused on their “core competencies,” outsourcing all other functions – sales, bookkeeping, IT, customer and product support, warranty work – to third party professionals and their companies.  Drafting agreements to capture this work is unlike drafting a conventional employment agreement.  It requires a sophisticated understanding of the service, benchmarks for performance and reporting, and the protection of confidential business information. The underlying agreement must comprehend how all of these elements operate together.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting services agreements in business.  Drafting services agreements for “hard” and “soft” services Scope of services provided, modification of services, and relationship to fees Performance standards and timeliness of delivery of services Types of fee structures and common traps Ensuring ownership of key files, records, “know how,” customer lists, and trade secrets Issues related to sub-contracting, designation of agents, and assignment of the contract Conflicts of interest, limitation of liability, and indemnification  Speaker:   Joel R. Buckberg is a partner in the Nashville office of Baker Donelson, LLP.  He more than 40 years’ experience in corporate and business transactions.  His practice focuses on corporate and asset transactions and operations, particularly in hospitality, franchising and distribution.  He also counsels clients on strategic planning, financing, mergers and acquisitions, system policy and practice development, regulatory compliance and contract system drafting. Prior to joining Baker Donelson, he was executive vice president and deputy general counsel of Cendant Corporation.  Mr. Buckberg received his B.S. form Union College, his M.B.A. from Vanderbilt University, and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/26/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Drafting Business Service Agreements

$79.00

  Companies are increasingly focused on their “core competencies,” outsourcing all other functions – sales, bookkeeping, IT, customer and product support, warranty work – to third party professionals and their companies.  Drafting agreements to capture this work is unlike drafting a conventional employment agreement.  It requires a sophisticated understanding of the service, benchmarks for performance and reporting, and the protection of confidential business information. The underlying agreement must comprehend how all of these elements operate together.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting services agreements in business.  Drafting services agreements for “hard” and “soft” services Scope of services provided, modification of services, and relationship to fees Performance standards and timeliness of delivery of services Types of fee structures and common traps Ensuring ownership of key files, records, “know how,” customer lists, and trade secrets Issues related to sub-contracting, designation of agents, and assignment of the contract Conflicts of interest, limitation of liability, and indemnification  Speaker:   Joel R. Buckberg is a partner in the Nashville office of Baker Donelson, LLP.  He more than 40 years’ experience in corporate and business transactions.  His practice focuses on corporate and asset transactions and operations, particularly in hospitality, franchising and distribution.  He also counsels clients on strategic planning, financing, mergers and acquisitions, system policy and practice development, regulatory compliance and contract system drafting. Prior to joining Baker Donelson, he was executive vice president and deputy general counsel of Cendant Corporation.  Mr. Buckberg received his B.S. form Union College, his M.B.A. from Vanderbilt University, and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law.    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/26/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics of Identifying Your Client: It's Not Always Easy

$79.00

The first step in every ethics analysis is answering the question, who is your client?  It’s seemingly a very easy question to answer, but it’s not always 20/20 except in hindsight.  Representing multiple parties on the same matter, whether in litigation or on a transaction, may mean you have many clients, some or all with conflicts.   If you’re a private practitioner and you represent an organization, your client may be the entity, its officers from whom you are taking directions, or possibly both. If you’re an in-house attorney, the analysis – and its implications for the attorney-client privilege – becomes even more complex.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethics of identifying your client in a variety of settings avoiding conflicts of interest with the client.  Ethics and identifying your client and avoiding conflicts in transactions and litigation Representing businesses entities, nonprofit associations, and the government – client v. person giving directions Identifying clients in trust and estate planning – the testator or the person paying your fees? Special ethical challenges and ethical risks for in-house counsel and attorney-client privilege issues How to untangle clients and conflicts in joint representations – managing conflicts and information flows Best practices in documenting client representation to avoid later challenge   Speakers: Elizabeth Treubert Simon is an ethics attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, where she advises on a wide range of ethics and compliance-related matters to support Akin Gump’s offices worldwide.  Previously, she practiced law in Washington DC and New York, focusing on business and commercial litigation and providing counsel to clients regarding professional ethics and attorney disciplinary procedures.  She is a member of the New York State Bar Association Committee on Professional Discipline and the District of Columbia Legal Ethics Committee.  She writes and speaks extensively on attorney ethics issues.   She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. from Albany Law School.   Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/27/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics of Identifying Your Client: It's Not Always Easy

$79.00

The first step in every ethics analysis is answering the question, who is your client?  It’s seemingly a very easy question to answer, but it’s not always 20/20 except in hindsight.  Representing multiple parties on the same matter, whether in litigation or on a transaction, may mean you have many clients, some or all with conflicts.   If you’re a private practitioner and you represent an organization, your client may be the entity, its officers from whom you are taking directions, or possibly both. If you’re an in-house attorney, the analysis – and its implications for the attorney-client privilege – becomes even more complex.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethics of identifying your client in a variety of settings avoiding conflicts of interest with the client.  Ethics and identifying your client and avoiding conflicts in transactions and litigation Representing businesses entities, nonprofit associations, and the government – client v. person giving directions Identifying clients in trust and estate planning – the testator or the person paying your fees? Special ethical challenges and ethical risks for in-house counsel and attorney-client privilege issues How to untangle clients and conflicts in joint representations – managing conflicts and information flows Best practices in documenting client representation to avoid later challenge   Speakers: Elizabeth Treubert Simon is an ethics attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, where she advises on a wide range of ethics and compliance-related matters to support Akin Gump’s offices worldwide.  Previously, she practiced law in Washington DC and New York, focusing on business and commercial litigation and providing counsel to clients regarding professional ethics and attorney disciplinary procedures.  She is a member of the New York State Bar Association Committee on Professional Discipline and the District of Columbia Legal Ethics Committee.  She writes and speaks extensively on attorney ethics issues.   She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania and her J.D. from Albany Law School.   Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a broad complex commercial, business and securities litigation practice. He also has a substantial practice advising businesses on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 20 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/27/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Valuation of Closely Held Companies

$79.00

Virtually every transaction of a closely held company requires a valuation. The company may be selling itself or some of its assets; obtaining a loan or placing equity with new investor; or the valuation may be needed for trust and estate planning. But valuing a closely held company is much art as science because there is no regular and liquid market matching buyers and sellers. This can make valuation highly contentious as parties argue over add-backs, discounts and premiums, and how to “price” cash flow or earnings. And all the familiar calculations have been altered by recent tax law changes. This program will provide you a real-world guide to valuation methodologies, areas of common dispute, and drafting tips. Valuation methodologies depending on the type of business or asset – asset-based, cash flow, market comps, and intrinsic value Role of objective factors v. professional judgment Impact of recent tax law changes on valuation Valuation premiums and discounts – “fair market value” and “fair value” Valuation drafting issues for lawyers Costly valuation mistakes and how to reduce risk of dispute   Speaker:

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/30/2022
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: 2022 Uniform Commercial Code Update

$79.00

The overlapping articles of the UCC impact most business, commercial and real estate transactions.  From the perfection of security interests to the enforceability of promissory notes and investment contracts to equipment leases and the sale of goods, the UCC plays a role in most significant transactions. This program, led by one of the nation’s leading authorities on the UCC, will provide you with a wide-ranging discussion of developments under the many articles of the UCC, including secured transactions, investment notes, sales, and equipment leasing.   Recent UCC developments for transactional attorneys Developments impacting commercial, business and real estate transactions UCC Article 9, asset-based transactions and secured transactions Sales of goods contracts Equipment leases, including computer equipment and capital equipment Notes, guarantees and letters of credit   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/31/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: 2022 Uniform Commercial Code Update

$79.00

The overlapping articles of the UCC impact most business, commercial and real estate transactions.  From the perfection of security interests to the enforceability of promissory notes and investment contracts to equipment leases and the sale of goods, the UCC plays a role in most significant transactions. This program, led by one of the nation’s leading authorities on the UCC, will provide you with a wide-ranging discussion of developments under the many articles of the UCC, including secured transactions, investment notes, sales, and equipment leasing.   Recent UCC developments for transactional attorneys Developments impacting commercial, business and real estate transactions UCC Article 9, asset-based transactions and secured transactions Sales of goods contracts Equipment leases, including computer equipment and capital equipment Notes, guarantees and letters of credit   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 5/31/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Structuring Minority Ownership Stakes in Companies

$79.00

Taking a minority ownership stake in a closely held company is a common occurrence. An investor may have taken a minority stake to fund growth in the business or someone may have provided essential, non-cash services – technical expertise, sales skill, management expertise – in exchange for equity. But there are substantial drawbacks with minority stakes. The minority stake holder may have limited access to information to the business and little or no control or influence over the ultimate success of the business.  The majority stake holder(s) may also seek to force out minority stake holders. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to structuring minority stake investments in anticipation of the majority stake owner eventually forcing the buyout of minority stake owners. Structuring minority stake ownership for eventual buyout by the majority stake owner How to avoid undue dispute and litigation through planning Framework of law protecting minority stake owners Equitable structuring of minority stake governance, information, and other rights Differences between passive minority-stake owner and those who actively participate in the business Valuation and buyout finance issues for majority stake owners Liquidity rights for minority stake owners Counseling techniques to help avoid open dispute among owners Speaker: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Molly Merritts is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she focuses her practice on a wide range of corporate law matters, including mergers and acquisitions, debt and equity financing, and real estate investment trusts. She also advises clients on corporate governance matters, transactional and commercial contract negotiations, and corporate reorganizations.  Ms. Merritt earned her B.S. from the University of Maryland, and her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/1/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Structuring Minority Ownership Stakes in Companies

$79.00

Taking a minority ownership stake in a closely held company is a common occurrence. An investor may have taken a minority stake to fund growth in the business or someone may have provided essential, non-cash services – technical expertise, sales skill, management expertise – in exchange for equity. But there are substantial drawbacks with minority stakes. The minority stake holder may have limited access to information to the business and little or no control or influence over the ultimate success of the business.  The majority stake holder(s) may also seek to force out minority stake holders. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to structuring minority stake investments in anticipation of the majority stake owner eventually forcing the buyout of minority stake owners. Structuring minority stake ownership for eventual buyout by the majority stake owner How to avoid undue dispute and litigation through planning Framework of law protecting minority stake owners Equitable structuring of minority stake governance, information, and other rights Differences between passive minority-stake owner and those who actively participate in the business Valuation and buyout finance issues for majority stake owners Liquidity rights for minority stake owners Counseling techniques to help avoid open dispute among owners Speaker: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Molly Merritts is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she focuses her practice on a wide range of corporate law matters, including mergers and acquisitions, debt and equity financing, and real estate investment trusts. She also advises clients on corporate governance matters, transactional and commercial contract negotiations, and corporate reorganizations.  Ms. Merritt earned her B.S. from the University of Maryland, and her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/1/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

2022 Retaliation and Wrongful Discharge Update

$79.00

    Retaliation claims are among the most common form of employment litigation, either as standalone claims or when a substantive claim of harassment or discrimination fails. The scope of an employee’s protected conduct – whistleblower activity, requests for accommodation, and other forms of activity – is not limitless but it expansive. There are also complicated questions of what constitutes an adverse action by an employer and the causal connection between the employee’s protected activity and the adverse action. This program will review of recent case law and other developments impacting each of the elements of an actionable retaliation claim and best practices to avoid liability.   Case law developments impacting elements of retaliation claims – protected conduct, adverse action, and causation Scope of “protected conduct,” including requests for reasonable accommodation What constitutes adverse action by the employer – and when action must be taken Standards for establishing causal link between protected conduct and adverse action Relationship among harassment, discrimination, ADA and retaliation claims  Speaker:  Ryan Derry is a partner in the San Francisco office of Paul Hastings, LLP.  His practice includes all aspects of employment litigation and counseling, including employment discrimination, retaliation, harassment, and wage and hour claims. He represents employers in multiple jurisdictions in state and federal courts as well as in administrative proceedings against individual and class claims. He has been named as a California Super Lawyer Rising Star for multiple years.  Mr. Derry received his B.S., summa cum laude, from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and his J.D. from The George Washington University Law School, with honors, in 2006.      

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/2/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

2022 Retaliation and Wrongful Discharge Update

$79.00

    Retaliation claims are among the most common form of employment litigation, either as standalone claims or when a substantive claim of harassment or discrimination fails. The scope of an employee’s protected conduct – whistleblower activity, requests for accommodation, and other forms of activity – is not limitless but it expansive. There are also complicated questions of what constitutes an adverse action by an employer and the causal connection between the employee’s protected activity and the adverse action. This program will review of recent case law and other developments impacting each of the elements of an actionable retaliation claim and best practices to avoid liability.   Case law developments impacting elements of retaliation claims – protected conduct, adverse action, and causation Scope of “protected conduct,” including requests for reasonable accommodation What constitutes adverse action by the employer – and when action must be taken Standards for establishing causal link between protected conduct and adverse action Relationship among harassment, discrimination, ADA and retaliation claims  Speaker:  Ryan Derry is a partner in the San Francisco office of Paul Hastings, LLP.  His practice includes all aspects of employment litigation and counseling, including employment discrimination, retaliation, harassment, and wage and hour claims. He represents employers in multiple jurisdictions in state and federal courts as well as in administrative proceedings against individual and class claims. He has been named as a California Super Lawyer Rising Star for multiple years.  Mr. Derry received his B.S., summa cum laude, from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and his J.D. from The George Washington University Law School, with honors, in 2006.      

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/2/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

2022 Trust Litigation Update

$79.00

  The world is in the midst of the greatest transfer of wealth ever recorded. Baby Boomers retired with more wealth than any earlier generation and retired with more complicated family circumstances.  This wealth and family complexity are giving rise to more trust litigation. This litigation includes the extent to which trust interests are reachable in divorce proceedings; fiduciary investment decisions, the handling of concentrated positions in closely held companies, and arguably tortious interference with trust interests. This program will review significant developments in fiduciary litigation.  Disputes over discretionary decisions, including distributions Tortious interference with inheritance interests Handling concentrated positions in closely held companies Disputes involving operation of family businesses in trusts Counseling clients when fiduciary litigation involves family animosity Speakers:  Steven B. Malech is partner in the New York City office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where he is chair of the firm’s probate litigation practice group.  He is represents beneficiaries, fiduciaries and creditors in disputes involving alleged violations of the Prudent Investor Act and its predecessors, alleged breaches of fiduciary duty, disputed accountings, and will contests. He represents clients in cutting edge probate litigation matters involving trusts and estates with assets in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Mr. Malech received his B.A., with special honors, from the University of Texas and his J.D. from the Connecticut School of Law.    

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/3/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

2022 Trust Litigation Update

$79.00

  The world is in the midst of the greatest transfer of wealth ever recorded. Baby Boomers retired with more wealth than any earlier generation and retired with more complicated family circumstances.  This wealth and family complexity are giving rise to more trust litigation. This litigation includes the extent to which trust interests are reachable in divorce proceedings; fiduciary investment decisions, the handling of concentrated positions in closely held companies, and arguably tortious interference with trust interests. This program will review significant developments in fiduciary litigation.  Disputes over discretionary decisions, including distributions Tortious interference with inheritance interests Handling concentrated positions in closely held companies Disputes involving operation of family businesses in trusts Counseling clients when fiduciary litigation involves family animosity Speakers:  Steven B. Malech is partner in the New York City office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where he is chair of the firm’s probate litigation practice group.  He is represents beneficiaries, fiduciaries and creditors in disputes involving alleged violations of the Prudent Investor Act and its predecessors, alleged breaches of fiduciary duty, disputed accountings, and will contests. He represents clients in cutting edge probate litigation matters involving trusts and estates with assets in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Mr. Malech received his B.A., with special honors, from the University of Texas and his J.D. from the Connecticut School of Law.    

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/3/2022
    Presented
SEE MORE