Course1

Restructuring Real Estate Deals Gone Bad, Part 1

$79.00

When a real estate project goes bad for whatever reason – sales are slow or at prices below projections, leasing is slow, or there are extensive cost-overruns or regulatory delays – developers, investors, lenders, and others are left scrambling to restructure the project and salvage any value or at least limit losses. This often involves restructuring or possibly refinancing a loan.  It may also involve additional equity.  Another option is selling the project, if possible.  These processes can be complicated by the nature of the investors and lenders involved.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to restructuring troubled real estate projects.  Day 1: Practical strategies for unwinding real estate deals outside of bankruptcy or litigation Negotiating, structuring and drafting the restructuring of failed real estate projects Underlying economics and tradeoffs of real estate restructuring Types of sellers and their impact on restructuring – individual owner, institutional, joint venture, private equity Complications and limitations involving syndicated loans, CMBS loans, and REMICs Navigating seller issues – personal guaranties, ongoing management fees, upside participation, reputation   Day 2: Restructuring alternatives, including straight purchases, “Loan to Own,” rescue capital/preferred stock/securities Drafting forbearance and loan modification agreements  Receivership of distressed properties and planning to emerge from receivership “Loan to own” strategies and limitations Tax issues, including cancellation of indebtedness and restructuring recourse indebtedness Potential loss of valuable tax attributes and tax planning opportunities   Speakers: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.He speaks extensively on real estate topics nationally.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/20/2024
    Presented
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Course1

Restructuring Real Estate Deals Gone Bad, Part 1

$79.00

When a real estate project goes bad for whatever reason – sales are slow or at prices below projections, leasing is slow, or there are extensive cost-overruns or regulatory delays – developers, investors, lenders, and others are left scrambling to restructure the project and salvage any value or at least limit losses. This often involves restructuring or possibly refinancing a loan.  It may also involve additional equity.  Another option is selling the project, if possible.  These processes can be complicated by the nature of the investors and lenders involved.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to restructuring troubled real estate projects.  Day 1: Practical strategies for unwinding real estate deals outside of bankruptcy or litigation Negotiating, structuring and drafting the restructuring of failed real estate projects Underlying economics and tradeoffs of real estate restructuring Types of sellers and their impact on restructuring – individual owner, institutional, joint venture, private equity Complications and limitations involving syndicated loans, CMBS loans, and REMICs Navigating seller issues – personal guaranties, ongoing management fees, upside participation, reputation   Day 2: Restructuring alternatives, including straight purchases, “Loan to Own,” rescue capital/preferred stock/securities Drafting forbearance and loan modification agreements  Receivership of distressed properties and planning to emerge from receivership “Loan to own” strategies and limitations Tax issues, including cancellation of indebtedness and restructuring recourse indebtedness Potential loss of valuable tax attributes and tax planning opportunities   Speakers: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.He speaks extensively on real estate topics nationally.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/20/2024
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Restructuring Real Estate Deals Gone Bad, Part 2

$79.00

When a real estate project goes bad for whatever reason – sales are slow or at prices below projections, leasing is slow, or there are extensive cost-overruns or regulatory delays – developers, investors, lenders, and others are left scrambling to restructure the project and salvage any value or at least limit losses. This often involves restructuring or possibly refinancing a loan.  It may also involve additional equity.  Another option is selling the project, if possible.  These processes can be complicated by the nature of the investors and lenders involved.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to restructuring troubled real estate projects.  Day 1: Practical strategies for unwinding real estate deals outside of bankruptcy or litigation Negotiating, structuring and drafting the restructuring of failed real estate projects Underlying economics and tradeoffs of real estate restructuring Types of sellers and their impact on restructuring – individual owner, institutional, joint venture, private equity Complications and limitations involving syndicated loans, CMBS loans, and REMICs Navigating seller issues – personal guaranties, ongoing management fees, upside participation, reputation   Day 2: Restructuring alternatives, including straight purchases, “Loan to Own,” rescue capital/preferred stock/securities Drafting forbearance and loan modification agreements  Receivership of distressed properties and planning to emerge from receivership “Loan to own” strategies and limitations Tax issues, including cancellation of indebtedness and restructuring recourse indebtedness Potential loss of valuable tax attributes and tax planning opportunities   Speakers: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.He speaks extensively on real estate topics nationally.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/21/2024
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Restructuring Real Estate Deals Gone Bad, Part 2

$79.00

When a real estate project goes bad for whatever reason – sales are slow or at prices below projections, leasing is slow, or there are extensive cost-overruns or regulatory delays – developers, investors, lenders, and others are left scrambling to restructure the project and salvage any value or at least limit losses. This often involves restructuring or possibly refinancing a loan.  It may also involve additional equity.  Another option is selling the project, if possible.  These processes can be complicated by the nature of the investors and lenders involved.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to restructuring troubled real estate projects.  Day 1: Practical strategies for unwinding real estate deals outside of bankruptcy or litigation Negotiating, structuring and drafting the restructuring of failed real estate projects Underlying economics and tradeoffs of real estate restructuring Types of sellers and their impact on restructuring – individual owner, institutional, joint venture, private equity Complications and limitations involving syndicated loans, CMBS loans, and REMICs Navigating seller issues – personal guaranties, ongoing management fees, upside participation, reputation   Day 2: Restructuring alternatives, including straight purchases, “Loan to Own,” rescue capital/preferred stock/securities Drafting forbearance and loan modification agreements  Receivership of distressed properties and planning to emerge from receivership “Loan to own” strategies and limitations Tax issues, including cancellation of indebtedness and restructuring recourse indebtedness Potential loss of valuable tax attributes and tax planning opportunities   Speakers: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.He speaks extensively on real estate topics nationally.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/21/2024
    Presented
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Course1

Text Messages & Litigation: Discovery and Evidentiary Issues

$79.00

Text messaging is mainstream. Clients generate virtual reams of data when they message with business partners, vendors, employees, and even public. This is a rich vein of electronically stored information that is potentially discoverable in formal litigation or pre-litigation.  Because texting is so convenient, casual and almost reflexive, the caution clients exercise in other forms of communication are often disregarded when texting, including when they text with their lawyers. This program will provide you with a practical guide to obtaining text messages, the risks of discovery in litigation, and related issues. Obtaining text messages – working with mobile carriers Timing – how long are texts kept and in what form? Discovery issues – obtaining texts from parties or other sources Issues related to encrypted messaging services How strategies differ for plaintiffs and defendants Speaker: Stanley E. Woodward Jr. is a partner in the law firm Brand Woodward Law, where he has a broad civil litigation and white-collar criminal defense practice.  He also conducts internal corporate investigations.  He serves as an adjunct professor of law at Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law, where he teaches pre-trial litigation and employment law. Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Vanessa Ruiz of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, and Judges Joan Zeldon and Judge Rufus King III of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia.  Mr. Woodward earned his B.A., cum laude, and his M.S., magna cum laude, from American University, and his J.D., cum laude, from The Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/23/2024
    Avail. Until
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics in Negotiations – Boasts, Shading, and Impropriety

$79.00

Lawyers must always be truthful in their representations. Yet they must be zealous in representing clients. The tension between these two principles is perhaps never as great as when the lawyer is negotiating for a client. The lawyer may make statements about the law or fact – or simply refrain from making statements because the lawyer knows certain facts or legal precedent are adverse to a client’s interest.   Lawyers may also boast, signaling that a client’s position is stronger than is, in fact, the case. Navigating these gray lines is the difference between ethical representation and impropriety. This program will provide you with a guide to ethical issues in negotiations.    Truthful representations v. zealous representations? Affirmative statements of fact, value or intent in settlements Silence about adverse law in negotiations Silence about facts unknown to an opponent or counter-party Silence about errors in settlement agreements or transactional documents Non-litigation work in another state – “temporary” practice   Speakers: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/24/2024
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics in Negotiations – Boasts, Shading, and Impropriety

$79.00

Lawyers must always be truthful in their representations. Yet they must be zealous in representing clients. The tension between these two principles is perhaps never as great as when the lawyer is negotiating for a client. The lawyer may make statements about the law or fact – or simply refrain from making statements because the lawyer knows certain facts or legal precedent are adverse to a client’s interest.   Lawyers may also boast, signaling that a client’s position is stronger than is, in fact, the case. Navigating these gray lines is the difference between ethical representation and impropriety. This program will provide you with a guide to ethical issues in negotiations.    Truthful representations v. zealous representations? Affirmative statements of fact, value or intent in settlements Silence about adverse law in negotiations Silence about facts unknown to an opponent or counter-party Silence about errors in settlement agreements or transactional documents Non-litigation work in another state – “temporary” practice   Speakers: Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School. Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/24/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Exit Rights in Business Agreements

$79.00

A client investment in an operating business, particularly a minority stake, is only as good as its liquidity rights. If a client cannot readily sell his or her ownership stake at fair market value, it has little real value. The key to ensuring liquidity is contractually creating a private market for the ownership stake. This market can come in the form of requiring other stakeholders, including the majority owner, to buy the minority stake at a mutually agreeable price, or creating other mechanisms for selling the stake to third parties. Without these contract rights, a stakeholder has no liquidity and is stuck. This program will provide you with a practical to planning and drafting contractual liquidity rights in closely held companies.   Planning and drafting liquidity rights in closely held companies Counseling clients about the limitations and risks of liquidity in closely held companies Framework of alternatives for determining most appropriate liquidity rights “Texas standoff” or “Russian roulette” – opportunities, risks and tradeoffs Drafting “tag-along” and “drag-along” rights – practical uses and drawbacks How to think about valuing closely held ownership stakes   Speaker: Michael Weiner is a partner in the Denver office of Dorsey & Whitney, where he is head of the firm’s corporate department.  His practice focuses on the representation of emerging growth companies in the areas of corporate formation, mergers and acquisitions, venture capital and angel finance, public offerings, and securities regulation. He counsels boards of directors and management teams in the areas of equity compensation, corporate governance, Sarbanes-Oxley and other regulatory and disclosure matters. He also advises clients on intellectual property licensing and commercial contract matters.  Mr. Weiner earned his B.S. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business, his B.A. in American history from the University of Pennsylvania College of Arts & Sciences, and J.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/25/2024
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Exit Rights in Business Agreements

$79.00

A client investment in an operating business, particularly a minority stake, is only as good as its liquidity rights. If a client cannot readily sell his or her ownership stake at fair market value, it has little real value. The key to ensuring liquidity is contractually creating a private market for the ownership stake. This market can come in the form of requiring other stakeholders, including the majority owner, to buy the minority stake at a mutually agreeable price, or creating other mechanisms for selling the stake to third parties. Without these contract rights, a stakeholder has no liquidity and is stuck. This program will provide you with a practical to planning and drafting contractual liquidity rights in closely held companies.   Planning and drafting liquidity rights in closely held companies Counseling clients about the limitations and risks of liquidity in closely held companies Framework of alternatives for determining most appropriate liquidity rights “Texas standoff” or “Russian roulette” – opportunities, risks and tradeoffs Drafting “tag-along” and “drag-along” rights – practical uses and drawbacks How to think about valuing closely held ownership stakes   Speaker: Michael Weiner is a partner in the Denver office of Dorsey & Whitney, where he is head of the firm’s corporate department.  His practice focuses on the representation of emerging growth companies in the areas of corporate formation, mergers and acquisitions, venture capital and angel finance, public offerings, and securities regulation. He counsels boards of directors and management teams in the areas of equity compensation, corporate governance, Sarbanes-Oxley and other regulatory and disclosure matters. He also advises clients on intellectual property licensing and commercial contract matters.  Mr. Weiner earned his B.S. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business, his B.A. in American history from the University of Pennsylvania College of Arts & Sciences, and J.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/25/2024
    Presented
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Course1

Trust and Estate Planning for Illquid Assets

$79.00

Liquidity is an almost universal need in trust and estate planning. When a client dies, death taxes may need to be paid.  Expenses incurred in administration need to be paid.  Distributions may be required under trust instruments.  For these and many other reasons, estates need cash.  The big challenge comes when the estate has assets that, though valuable, are not liquid.  Assets may include real estate that is not quickly or cost-effectively sold.  Or a successful family business may be involved, where ownership stakes are not easily transferred or for which there is no ready market.  Complex financial assets, artwork or other unique property, hard to value and hard to sell, may also be held.  Trust and estate plans must anticipate the need for liquidity and formulate strategies for providing it or deferring taxes and distributions until liquidity can be created. This program will provide you with a real world guide to practical strategies for creating liquidity in trust and estate planning. Challenges of planning for illiquid assets like real estate, family businesses, and unique property Techniques and tools to fund tax liabilities, distributions, expenses and more Mechanics of electing a deferral of estate tax under IRC Section 6166 Use and advantages of using Graegin notes to obtain liquidity Advantages and disadvantages of use of redemptions and buy-sell agreements Use of life insurance and other financial products to provide liquidity Speakers: Jonathan Gopman is a partner with Akerman, LLP in Naples and chair of the firm’s trusts and estate practice group.  His practice focuses on sophisticated wealth accumulation and preservation planning strategies for entrepreneurs.  He also assists entrepreneurs with their personal and business planning needs at all phases of the wealth accumulation and preservation cycle.  Mr. Gopman is a Fellow of the American College of Tax Counsel and co-author of the revised version of the BNA Tax Management Portfolio on Estate Tax Payments and Liabilities.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/26/2024
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Trust and Estate Planning for Illquid Assets

$79.00

Liquidity is an almost universal need in trust and estate planning. When a client dies, death taxes may need to be paid.  Expenses incurred in administration need to be paid.  Distributions may be required under trust instruments.  For these and many other reasons, estates need cash.  The big challenge comes when the estate has assets that, though valuable, are not liquid.  Assets may include real estate that is not quickly or cost-effectively sold.  Or a successful family business may be involved, where ownership stakes are not easily transferred or for which there is no ready market.  Complex financial assets, artwork or other unique property, hard to value and hard to sell, may also be held.  Trust and estate plans must anticipate the need for liquidity and formulate strategies for providing it or deferring taxes and distributions until liquidity can be created. This program will provide you with a real world guide to practical strategies for creating liquidity in trust and estate planning. Challenges of planning for illiquid assets like real estate, family businesses, and unique property Techniques and tools to fund tax liabilities, distributions, expenses and more Mechanics of electing a deferral of estate tax under IRC Section 6166 Use and advantages of using Graegin notes to obtain liquidity Advantages and disadvantages of use of redemptions and buy-sell agreements Use of life insurance and other financial products to provide liquidity Speakers: Jonathan Gopman is a partner with Akerman, LLP in Naples and chair of the firm’s trusts and estate practice group.  His practice focuses on sophisticated wealth accumulation and preservation planning strategies for entrepreneurs.  He also assists entrepreneurs with their personal and business planning needs at all phases of the wealth accumulation and preservation cycle.  Mr. Gopman is a Fellow of the American College of Tax Counsel and co-author of the revised version of the BNA Tax Management Portfolio on Estate Tax Payments and Liabilities.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/26/2024
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

The Ethics of Bad Facts and Bad Law

$79.00

Every lawyer wrestles with how to handle facts or law that is unfavorable to a client. There is a natural tension between a lawyer’s duty to be honest, on the one hand, and the lawyer’s duty to provide zealous representation of a client.  In some instances, bad facts or bad law must be disclosed.  In other instances, disclosure is not required. How this tension is resolved involves substantial ethical issues.  This program will discuss the ethics issues involved and how they may be resolved in a practical setting. Ethical issues surrounding the representation of adverse facts to tribunals and adversaries Disclosure of adverse legal precedents Required discloses of bad facts or law Timing issues – when must the disclosure occur? Related issues of confidentiality and the attorney-client privilege Ex parte communications with the courts – what’s ethically permissible, what’s not? Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/27/2024
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

The Ethics of Bad Facts and Bad Law

$79.00

Every lawyer wrestles with how to handle facts or law that is unfavorable to a client. There is a natural tension between a lawyer’s duty to be honest, on the one hand, and the lawyer’s duty to provide zealous representation of a client.  In some instances, bad facts or bad law must be disclosed.  In other instances, disclosure is not required. How this tension is resolved involves substantial ethical issues.  This program will discuss the ethics issues involved and how they may be resolved in a practical setting. Ethical issues surrounding the representation of adverse facts to tribunals and adversaries Disclosure of adverse legal precedents Required discloses of bad facts or law Timing issues – when must the disclosure occur? Related issues of confidentiality and the attorney-client privilege Ex parte communications with the courts – what’s ethically permissible, what’s not? Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/27/2024
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

Trust and Estate Planning for Illquid Assets

$79.00

Liquidity is an almost universal need in trust and estate planning. When a client dies, death taxes may need to be paid.  Expenses incurred in administration need to be paid.  Distributions may be required under trust instruments.  For these and many other reasons, estates need cash.  The big challenge comes when the estate has assets that, though valuable, are not liquid.  Assets may include real estate that is not quickly or cost-effectively sold.  Or a successful family business may be involved, where ownership stakes are not easily transferred or for which there is no ready market.  Complex financial assets, artwork or other unique property, hard to value and hard to sell, may also be held.  Trust and estate plans must anticipate the need for liquidity and formulate strategies for providing it or deferring taxes and distributions until liquidity can be created. This program will provide you with a real world guide to practical strategies for creating liquidity in trust and estate planning. Challenges of planning for illiquid assets like real estate, family businesses, and unique property Techniques and tools to fund tax liabilities, distributions, expenses and more Mechanics of electing a deferral of estate tax under IRC Section 6166 Use and advantages of using Graegin notes to obtain liquidity Advantages and disadvantages of use of redemptions and buy-sell agreements Use of life insurance and other financial products to provide liquidity Speakers: Jonathan Gopman is a partner with Akerman, LLP in Naples and chair of the firm’s trusts and estate practice group.  His practice focuses on sophisticated wealth accumulation and preservation planning strategies for entrepreneurs.  He also assists entrepreneurs with their personal and business planning needs at all phases of the wealth accumulation and preservation cycle.  Mr. Gopman is a Fellow of the American College of Tax Counsel and co-author of the revised version of the BNA Tax Management Portfolio on Estate Tax Payments and Liabilities.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/28/2024
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Special Issues in Small Trusts

$79.00

There are many more small trusts than large trusts and they pose special challenges for trust planners and administrators.  The fees paid to trustees and to investment professionals, together with ongoing reporting and fiduciary income tax compliance costs, can consume a substantial portion of the trust’s liquid assets or income.  There are also the challenges in the types of assets commonly held by small trusts. In other instances, trusts may cease to be practically and financially viable, and may need to be restructured or even terminated. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting, structuring and administering small trusts – and what to do when they cease to be viable entities.    Economics of small trusts – trustee compensation, reimbursement of expenses, investment fees Challenges of trust management of operating businesses and real estate Restructuring or terminating trusts that are no longer economically viable Custodial accounts and other alternatives to small trusts Choosing a trustee for a small trust versus a larger trust   Speaker: Victoria Bowling is an Associate at Midgett Preti Olansen concentrating in the areas of estate planning and administration. Ms. Bowling has experience crafting uniquely tailored estate plans for her clients and guiding them through the administration process. Ms. Bowling especially enjoys the educational aspect of estate planning, so her clients truly understand their documents and the estate administration process. She is admitted to practice law in Virginia and a member of the Virginia State Bar. Before attending law school, Ms. Bowling was a Deputy Clerk in the Virginia Beach Circuit Court and worked as a paralegal for a local family lawyer.   

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/28/2024
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Special Issues in Small Trusts

$79.00

There are many more small trusts than large trusts and they pose special challenges for trust planners and administrators.  The fees paid to trustees and to investment professionals, together with ongoing reporting and fiduciary income tax compliance costs, can consume a substantial portion of the trust’s liquid assets or income.  There are also the challenges in the types of assets commonly held by small trusts. In other instances, trusts may cease to be practically and financially viable, and may need to be restructured or even terminated. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting, structuring and administering small trusts – and what to do when they cease to be viable entities.    Economics of small trusts – trustee compensation, reimbursement of expenses, investment fees Challenges of trust management of operating businesses and real estate Restructuring or terminating trusts that are no longer economically viable Custodial accounts and other alternatives to small trusts Choosing a trustee for a small trust versus a larger trust   Speaker: Victoria Bowling is an Associate at Midgett Preti Olansen concentrating in the areas of estate planning and administration. Ms. Bowling has experience crafting uniquely tailored estate plans for her clients and guiding them through the administration process. Ms. Bowling especially enjoys the educational aspect of estate planning, so her clients truly understand their documents and the estate administration process. She is admitted to practice law in Virginia and a member of the Virginia State Bar. Before attending law school, Ms. Bowling was a Deputy Clerk in the Virginia Beach Circuit Court and worked as a paralegal for a local family lawyer.   

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/28/2024
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

The Ethics of Bad Facts and Bad Law

$79.00

Every lawyer wrestles with how to handle facts or law that is unfavorable to a client. There is a natural tension between a lawyer’s duty to be honest, on the one hand, and the lawyer’s duty to provide zealous representation of a client.  In some instances, bad facts or bad law must be disclosed.  In other instances, disclosure is not required. How this tension is resolved involves substantial ethical issues.  This program will discuss the ethics issues involved and how they may be resolved in a practical setting. Ethical issues surrounding the representation of adverse facts to tribunals and adversaries Disclosure of adverse legal precedents Required discloses of bad facts or law Timing issues – when must the disclosure occur? Related issues of confidentiality and the attorney-client privilege Ex parte communications with the courts – what’s ethically permissible, what’s not? Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 6/29/2024
    Avail. Until
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics for Transactional Lawyers

$79.00

Representing a client in a business, commercial or real estate transaction can get ethically complicated very quickly.  There is the question of who you represent.  In a closely held company, with multiple shareholders or members, this can be problematic if the officer or manager from whom you are taking instructions thinks you represent that person and not the entity.  The client may offer you the opportunity to buy into a transaction, which puts your role as lawyer in tension with your role as investor.  There are also substantial ethical issues involved in negotiations and whether a party on the other side of the transaction is represented by legal counsel or not. This program will provide you with a real world guide to the ethics of representing clients in business, commercial, and legal transactions. Representation – who is your client? The company’s board or its owners? Do they know that? Counter-parties – how do you negotiate on behalf of your client with unrepresented parties? Business with clients – can you buy into (or be given) a stake in a client’s business or a transaction? Serving on a client’s board of directors – how do you separate your legal role from your fiduciary obligation? Negotiations – how do ethics rules limit your flexibility to negotiate? Speakers: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.   Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/1/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Ethics for Transactional Lawyers

$79.00

Representing a client in a business, commercial or real estate transaction can get ethically complicated very quickly.  There is the question of who you represent.  In a closely held company, with multiple shareholders or members, this can be problematic if the officer or manager from whom you are taking instructions thinks you represent that person and not the entity.  The client may offer you the opportunity to buy into a transaction, which puts your role as lawyer in tension with your role as investor.  There are also substantial ethical issues involved in negotiations and whether a party on the other side of the transaction is represented by legal counsel or not. This program will provide you with a real world guide to the ethics of representing clients in business, commercial, and legal transactions. Representation – who is your client? The company’s board or its owners? Do they know that? Counter-parties – how do you negotiate on behalf of your client with unrepresented parties? Business with clients – can you buy into (or be given) a stake in a client’s business or a transaction? Serving on a client’s board of directors – how do you separate your legal role from your fiduciary obligation? Negotiations – how do ethics rules limit your flexibility to negotiate? Speakers: William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Web site “Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com.   Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/1/2024
    Presented
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Course1

2022 Sex Harassment Update

$79.00

This program will provide you with an update on recent developments in sex harassment claims.  The discussion will include case law developments, trends in claims and defenses, and legislative proposals.  The program will cover how to handle recent allegations of harassment based on conduct occurring years ago and best practices in revising policies and procedures to handle allegations of misconduct. This program will provide you with a wide-ranging discussion of significant developments in sex harassment law. Significant sex harassment case law developments Regulatory developments and legislative proposals How to investigate new complaints of old misconduct Sex harassment issues arising from online posts and messaging Best practices in revising sex harassment policies   Speaker: Sarah Besnoff is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Paul Hastings, LLP, where she represents employers of all sizes in employment matters.She focuses her employment law practice on wage and hour and employment discrimination litigation, and employment counseling.Prior to joining the firm, she served as a judicial clerk to Judge C. Darnell Jones II of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. She is a Lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and the Fels Institute of Government.Ms. Besnoff earned her B.A., magna cum laude, from Barnard College, her M.P.A. from the University of Pennsylvania, Fels Institute of Government, and her J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/1/2024
    Avail. Until
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LIVE REPLAY: Evidentiary Issues with Text and "Chat" Messages

$79.00

Text messaging is mainstream. Clients generate virtual reams of data when they message with business partners, vendors, employees, and even public. This is a rich vein of electronically stored information that is potentially discoverable in formal litigation or pre-litigation.  Because texting is so convenient, casual and almost reflexive, the caution clients exercise in other forms of communication are often disregarded when texting, including when they text with their lawyers. This program will provide you with a practical guide to obtaining text messages, the risks of discovery in litigation, and related issues. Obtaining text messages – working with mobile carriers Timing – how long are texts kept and in what form? Discovery issues – obtaining texts from parties or other sources Issues related to encrypted messaging services How strategies differ for plaintiffs and defendants Speaker: Stanley E. Woodward Jr. is a partner in the law firm Brand Woodward Law, where he has a broad civil litigation and white-collar criminal defense practice.  He also conducts internal corporate investigations.  He serves as an adjunct professor of law at Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law, where he teaches pre-trial litigation and employment law. Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Vanessa Ruiz of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, and Judges Joan Zeldon and Judge Rufus King III of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/2/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Evidentiary Issues with Text and "Chat" Messages

$79.00

Text messaging is mainstream. Clients generate virtual reams of data when they message with business partners, vendors, employees, and even public. This is a rich vein of electronically stored information that is potentially discoverable in formal litigation or pre-litigation.  Because texting is so convenient, casual and almost reflexive, the caution clients exercise in other forms of communication are often disregarded when texting, including when they text with their lawyers. This program will provide you with a practical guide to obtaining text messages, the risks of discovery in litigation, and related issues. Obtaining text messages – working with mobile carriers Timing – how long are texts kept and in what form? Discovery issues – obtaining texts from parties or other sources Issues related to encrypted messaging services How strategies differ for plaintiffs and defendants Speaker: Stanley E. Woodward Jr. is a partner in the law firm Brand Woodward Law, where he has a broad civil litigation and white-collar criminal defense practice.  He also conducts internal corporate investigations.  He serves as an adjunct professor of law at Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law, where he teaches pre-trial litigation and employment law. Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Vanessa Ruiz of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, and Judges Joan Zeldon and Judge Rufus King III of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia.  

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/2/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Responding to Demand Letters: Tone and Substance

$79.00

Responding to a demand letter is as tricky as issuing a demanding letter.  There are issues of getting the substance right and getting the tone right.  How time do you spend researching the law and laying out your case?  How much do you disclose about your favorable facts? Is your goal settlement and, if so, how does that impact the tone of your letter?  Do you know enough about the letter writer and his or her client to gauge their likely reaction to your response?  And when do you respond – right away, by any deadline given, or do you wait?  These and many other questions will be addressed in this practical discussion of the tradeoffs of responding to demand letters.    Goals – do you want settlement or to make it go away – or are you preparing for litigation?  Law – how much do you research and push back? Tone – are you assertive, making counter-demands, or conciliatory? Facts – How much of what you know do you lay out? Timing – responding right away, by a deadline in the demand, or later?   Speaker: William J. Kelly, III is a founding member of Kelly Law Partners LLC and has nearly 30 years’ experience in the areas of employment and commercial litigation. In the area of employment law, he litigates trade secret, non-compete, infringement and discrimination claims in federal and state courts nationwide and has advised Fortune 50 companies on workplace policies and practices.  In the area of commercial litigation, his experience includes class action litigation, breach of contract and indemnity, mass-claim complex insurance litigation, construction litigation and trade secrets.  Earlier in career, he founded 15 Minutes Music, an independent music production company.  Mr. Kelly earned his B.A. from Tulane University and his J.D. from St. Louis University School of Law.

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/3/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Responding to Demand Letters: Tone and Substance

$79.00

Responding to a demand letter is as tricky as issuing a demanding letter.  There are issues of getting the substance right and getting the tone right.  How time do you spend researching the law and laying out your case?  How much do you disclose about your favorable facts? Is your goal settlement and, if so, how does that impact the tone of your letter?  Do you know enough about the letter writer and his or her client to gauge their likely reaction to your response?  And when do you respond – right away, by any deadline given, or do you wait?  These and many other questions will be addressed in this practical discussion of the tradeoffs of responding to demand letters.    Goals – do you want settlement or to make it go away – or are you preparing for litigation?  Law – how much do you research and push back? Tone – are you assertive, making counter-demands, or conciliatory? Facts – How much of what you know do you lay out? Timing – responding right away, by a deadline in the demand, or later?   Speaker: William J. Kelly, III is a founding member of Kelly Law Partners LLC and has nearly 30 years’ experience in the areas of employment and commercial litigation. In the area of employment law, he litigates trade secret, non-compete, infringement and discrimination claims in federal and state courts nationwide and has advised Fortune 50 companies on workplace policies and practices.  In the area of commercial litigation, his experience includes class action litigation, breach of contract and indemnity, mass-claim complex insurance litigation, construction litigation and trade secrets.  Earlier in career, he founded 15 Minutes Music, an independent music production company.  Mr. Kelly earned his B.A. from Tulane University and his J.D. from St. Louis University School of Law.

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/3/2024
    Presented
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Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Lawyer Ethics When Storing Files in the Cloud

$79.00

Most files are now stored in the “cloud,” a global network of servers that store files for organizations of every size, including law firms.  Many applications, including word processing, email and billing software packages that are used daily by lawyers and law firms, are also stored and used in the cloud.  This dramatic shift in the way files are created, modified, stored, and shared has substantial implications for law firms.   The first is a duty of competence requirement that lawyers understand how the technology they employ works and how it might impact client communications and confidentiality, among many other issues.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to ethical issues when lawyers and law firm store and create files in the cloud.   Technology competence as an ethical duty of competence Ethical benchmarks and diligence for ensuring file and communication confidentiality in the cloud Mobile access – issues when the cloud is used via smartphone or tablet What if your client uses the cloud but you do not? Attorney-client privilege issues when using the cloud to communicate Internal policies – ensuring law firm security supplements cloud security   Speakers: Matthew Corbin is Senior Vice President and Executive Director in the Professional Services Group of AON Risk Services, where he consults with the company’s law firm clients on professional responsibility and liability issues.  Before joining AON, he was a partner with Lathrop & Gage, LLP, where he was a trial and appellate lawyer handling professional liability, commercial, business tort, employment, construction, insurance, and regulatory matters. Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Mary Briscoe of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.   Mark A. Webster is Vice President and Director in the Professional Services Group of AON Risk Services.  He consults with the company’s law firm clients on professional responsibility and liability issues.? Before joining AON, he was a partner with Lathrop & Gage, LLP, where he had an extensive real estate transactions practice.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/5/2024
    Presented
SEE MORE
Course1

LIVE REPLAY: Lawyer Ethics When Storing Files in the Cloud

$79.00

Most files are now stored in the “cloud,” a global network of servers that store files for organizations of every size, including law firms.  Many applications, including word processing, email and billing software packages that are used daily by lawyers and law firms, are also stored and used in the cloud.  This dramatic shift in the way files are created, modified, stored, and shared has substantial implications for law firms.   The first is a duty of competence requirement that lawyers understand how the technology they employ works and how it might impact client communications and confidentiality, among many other issues.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to ethical issues when lawyers and law firm store and create files in the cloud.   Technology competence as an ethical duty of competence Ethical benchmarks and diligence for ensuring file and communication confidentiality in the cloud Mobile access – issues when the cloud is used via smartphone or tablet What if your client uses the cloud but you do not? Attorney-client privilege issues when using the cloud to communicate Internal policies – ensuring law firm security supplements cloud security   Speakers: Matthew Corbin is Senior Vice President and Executive Director in the Professional Services Group of AON Risk Services, where he consults with the company’s law firm clients on professional responsibility and liability issues.  Before joining AON, he was a partner with Lathrop & Gage, LLP, where he was a trial and appellate lawyer handling professional liability, commercial, business tort, employment, construction, insurance, and regulatory matters. Before entering private practice, he served as a judicial clerk to Judge Mary Briscoe of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.   Mark A. Webster is Vice President and Director in the Professional Services Group of AON Risk Services.  He consults with the company’s law firm clients on professional responsibility and liability issues.? Before joining AON, he was a partner with Lathrop & Gage, LLP, where he had an extensive real estate transactions practice.  

  • Audio Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/5/2024
    Presented
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Course1

Roadmap of Venture Capital and Angel Funding, Part 1

$79.00

Rapidly growing companies often raise capital in “angel” or venture capital transactions.  Investors provide capital in exchange for carefully structured equity rights and frequently some form of governance rights. Investors also often provide the company with industry expertise, contacts, and access that may be as valuable as financial capital. These funding transactions can take a startup or more mature company to higher levels of growth. But they are complex transactions that can involve a dozen or more interrelated documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the stages and documentation of an angel or venture capital transaction.   Day 1: Current state of angel and venture capital markets & trends in deal terms Review of the suite of documents involved in most funding deals Methods of valuation and their impact on successive stages of investment Reviewing or drafting terms sheets – pitfalls and opportunities Angel investing – equity v. debt, common terms, impact on later venture capital funding   Day 2: Review of most highly negotiated terms in funding deals Investor protections – information  & veto rights, liquidity event rights Liquidation preferences, anti-dilution rights, and dividends Striking the right balance between founders/managers and investors on the board Options pools for founders, managers and employees   Speakers: Howard Bobrow is a partner in the Cleveland, Ohio office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he chairs the firm’s venture capital practice. He counsels private equity and venture capital firms, other institutional investors and angel investors on all aspects of acquisitions, dispositions, capital formation and private placements. He regularly represents and advises funds on their organization and formation, the fundraising process, governance matters, investments and compliance with pertinent regulations.  Mr. Bobrow earned his B.S. from Miami University and his J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law. Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/7/2024
    Avail. Until
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Course1

Roadmap of Venture Capital and Angel Funding, Part 2

$79.00

Rapidly growing companies often raise capital in “angel” or venture capital transactions.  Investors provide capital in exchange for carefully structured equity rights and frequently some form of governance rights. Investors also often provide the company with industry expertise, contacts, and access that may be as valuable as financial capital. These funding transactions can take a startup or more mature company to higher levels of growth. But they are complex transactions that can involve a dozen or more interrelated documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the stages and documentation of an angel or venture capital transaction.   Day 1: Current state of angel and venture capital markets & trends in deal terms Review of the suite of documents involved in most funding deals Methods of valuation and their impact on successive stages of investment Reviewing or drafting terms sheets – pitfalls and opportunities Angel investing – equity v. debt, common terms, impact on later venture capital funding   Day 2: Review of most highly negotiated terms in funding deals Investor protections – information  & veto rights, liquidity event rights Liquidation preferences, anti-dilution rights, and dividends Striking the right balance between founders/managers and investors on the board Options pools for founders, managers and employees   Speakers: Howard Bobrow is a partner in the Cleveland, Ohio office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he chairs the firm’s venture capital practice. He counsels private equity and venture capital firms, other institutional investors and angel investors on all aspects of acquisitions, dispositions, capital formation and private placements. He regularly represents and advises funds on their organization and formation, the fundraising process, governance matters, investments and compliance with pertinent regulations.  Mr. Bobrow earned his B.S. from Miami University and his J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law. Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/8/2024
    Avail. Until
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Charitable Giving Planning in Trusts and Estates, Part 2

$79.00

Charitable giving can be a major portion of clients’ trust estate planning and introduce substantial complexity. Charitable giving may be motivated less by a desire for tax savings and more by a desire to have an impact on a specific charity or a community.  Clients may also want to retain some measure of control during their lifetimes over the property they are donating and retain income from the property. Though there is a vast array of vehicles and planning techniques to achieve these goals, working through the alternatives is daunting.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the range of charitable giving vehicles, planning techniques to achieve client goals, tax and non-tax tradeoffs, and integrating charitable giving with overall estate plans. Day 1: Charitable giving vehicles and techniques & advantages and disadvantages of each Integrating charitable giving into overall estate plans Use of Charitable Remainder Trusts and Charitable Lead Trusts to achieve client goals Donating life insurance policies and proceeds and related trust issues How to restructure restricted charitable gifts Tax pitfalls of charitable giving Post-mortem charitable giving techniques Day 2: Advantages and disadvantages of using private foundations, supporting organizations, and donor-advised funds Structuring funds to provide maximum flexibility to the endowment and satisfy donor demands for control Donating illiquid and difficult-to-value assets to charity – real estate, interests in closely held businesses, works of art Review of faith-based giving initiatives and related legal issues   Speakers:  Michael Lehmann is a partner in the New York office of Dechert, LLP, where he specializes in tax issues related to non-profits and in the tax treatment of cross-border transactions.  He advises hospitals and other health care providers, research organizations, low-income housing developers, trade associations, private foundations and arts organizations.  He advises clients on obtaining and maintaining tax-exempt status, executive compensation, reorganizations and joint ventures, acquisitions, and unrelated business income planning.  Mr. Lehmann received his A.B., magna cum laude, from Brown University, his J.D. from Columbia Law School, and his LL.M. from New York University School of Law. Daniel L. Daniels is a partner in the Greenwich, Connecticut office of Wiggin and Dana, LLP, where his practice focuses on representing business owners, corporate executives and other wealthy individuals and their families.  A Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, he is listed in “The Best Lawyers in America,” and has been named by “Worth” magazine as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in the United States representing affluent individuals. Mr. Daniels is co-author of a monthly column in “Trusts and Estates” magazine.  Mr. Daniels received his A.B., summa cum laude, from Dartmouth College and received his J.D., with honors, from Harvard Law School.

  • MP3 Download
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/8/2024
    Avail. Until
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Course1

Roadmap of Venture Capital and Angel Funding, Part 1

$79.00

Rapidly growing companies often raise capital in “angel” or venture capital transactions.  Investors provide capital in exchange for carefully structured equity rights and frequently some form of governance rights. Investors also often provide the company with industry expertise, contacts, and access that may be as valuable as financial capital. These funding transactions can take a startup or more mature company to higher levels of growth. But they are complex transactions that can involve a dozen or more interrelated documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the stages and documentation of an angel or venture capital transaction.   Day 1: Current state of angel and venture capital markets & trends in deal terms Review of the suite of documents involved in most funding deals Methods of valuation and their impact on successive stages of investment Reviewing or drafting terms sheets – pitfalls and opportunities Angel investing – equity v. debt, common terms, impact on later venture capital funding   Day 2: Review of most highly negotiated terms in funding deals Investor protections – information  & veto rights, liquidity event rights Liquidation preferences, anti-dilution rights, and dividends Striking the right balance between founders/managers and investors on the board Options pools for founders, managers and employees   Speakers: Howard Bobrow is a partner in the Cleveland, Ohio office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he chairs the firm’s venture capital practice. He counsels private equity and venture capital firms, other institutional investors and angel investors on all aspects of acquisitions, dispositions, capital formation and private placements. He regularly represents and advises funds on their organization and formation, the fundraising process, governance matters, investments and compliance with pertinent regulations.   Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  

  • Teleseminar
    Format
  • 60
    Minutes
  • 7/8/2024
    Presented
SEE MORE